2010 Business School Rankings from The Economist

Recently The Economist released the 2010 edition of its global business school rankings. As the editors of The Economist noted in their introduction to this year’s rankings, “Usually, schools move up or down just a few places year on year. This time around, however, swings have been wilder.”

It looks like the rocky job market is to blame for that. Looking at The Economist’s rankings methodology, you’ll see that the “Open new career opportunities” and “Increase salary” categories together make up more than half of the overall score a school earns. Naturally, as the rough economy meant that some schools had an especially hard time placing grads in high-paying jobs (or, in some cases, in any jobs at all), those programs took a hit in the rankings.

Without further ado, here are the top 20 schools in the rankings:

The Economist MBA Rankings – 2010

  1. University of Chicago – Booth School of Business
  2. Dartmouth College – Tuck School of Business
  3. University of California at Berkeley – Haas School of Business
  4. Harvard Business School
  5. IESE Business School – University of Navarra
  6. IMD – International Institute for Management Development
  7. Stanford Graduate School of Business
  8. University of Pennsylvania – Wharton School
  9. HEC School of Management, Paris
  10. York University – Schulich School of Business
  11. University of Virginia – Darden Graduate School of Business
  12. Columbia Business School
  13. Massachusetts Institute of Technology – MIT Sloan School of Management
  14. New York University – Leonard N Stern School of Business
  15. Cranfield School of Management
  16. Northwestern University – Kellogg School of Management
  17. Henley Business School
  18. University of Southern California – Marshall School of Business
  19. London Business School
  20. ESADE Business School

How to Use Business School Rankings
When you start researching your target MBA programs, of course it make sense to pay to the rankings. Simply by existing, the rankings influence other applicants, employers, faculty members, and other key people. However, trying to discern which is better of two programs when one program is ranked higher by U.S. News, and the other ranks higher in The Economist’s rankings, is a fool’s errand. Use the rankings to help determine what level of program (in terms of admissions competitiveness) you might be able to get into, and to spot programs with specific strengths you might otherwise have missed. After that, do your own research and decide what programs fit you best.

For more news and advice on getting into the world’s most competitive MBA programs, be sure to subscribe to this blog and to follow us on Twitter!

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